Tyson Fury reveals SHOCK plan to run for Prime Minister in 2030

Tyson Fury reveals bizarre plan to run for PRIME MINISTER in 2030 as the two-time heavyweight champion adds leading the UK to his post-retirement bucket list

  • Tyson Fury revealed his plan to run for Prime Minister at his restaurant opening
  • The heavyweight champion asked for fans to vote for him at the 2030 election
  • Fury officially retired from the ring after knocking out Dillian Whyte in April
  • He opened his brand new Sultan of Lancaster Experience restaurant this week

Tyson Fury has hinted that he will run for Prime Minister in 2030 after opening his new restaurant in Lancaster.

The two-time world heavyweight champion called an end to his boxing career in April after knocking out Dillian Whyte at Wembley.

Following Boris Johnson’s resignation in early July, Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss have sparred off in a war to become the next Prime Minister – and it’s a fight the Gypsy King is potentially eyeing up in the future.

Retired boxer Tyson Fury revealed his plan to run for Prime Minister and lead the UK in 2030

The 33-year-old opened his brand new restaurant – the Sultan Lancaster Experience – this week

Fury spoke to fans at the grand opening of the Sultan of Lancaster Experience restaurant and revealed that he one day has plans to lead the UK.  

‘I want to say thank you to everyone who turned up today,’ he said.

‘Don’t forget to vote for me in 2030 as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom – vote Fury.

The Gypsy King called an end to his career after knocking out Dillian Whyte at Wembley in April

He is keen to become Prime Minister in 2030 following Boris Johnson’s resignation from No 10 

‘[Sultan’s] is now officially open to everybody.’

Despite his retirement from boxing, Fury has flirted with a lucrative return to the ring should British rival Anthony Joshua prevail in his rematch against Oleksandr Usyk next month.

However, the 33-year-old previously said that he would only face the winner of the bout for a jaw-dropping match fee of £500million.




Share this article

Source: Read Full Article